Rehearsal with The Royal Nelson Orchestra

Fink + 59 productions

Discovered yet another fantastic band, just in time to see them perform live in Stockholm at Nalen. The band’s name is Fink. An amazing band, that I discovered when I was researching for my thesis and by change came upon a YouTube video. The video shows the making of their tour “Perfect Darkness”, which was designed together with the video production company “59 productions”, in which they use video projection and light design to create this beautiful concept for the show. So inspiring!!

 

 

Discovered yet another fantastic band, just in time to see them perform live in Stockholm at Nalen. The band’s name is Fink. An amazing band, that I discovered when I was researching for my thesis and by change came upon a YouTube video. The video shows the making of their tour “Perfect Darkness”, which was designed together with the video production company “59 productions”, in which they use video projection and light design to create this beautiful concept for the show. So inspiring!!

 

 

How come it’s extremely difficult for artists to live on their talent?
A brilliant description of one the obstacles, made by Stefan Karlsson, Janne Lundqvist, Sara Lönnroth and Niklas Strandqvist. Taken from their report “Att leva på sin talang – kreatörers behov av entreprenörskap”
A common trait among artists is the notion that creative development is the only thing of importance - a mindset that means that the focus is on the creative idea, the drive and the feel. Artists with such mindset are often so focused on their work and its completion, that the importance of the outside world at least as a "consumer" completely disappears. In this situation there also exists a fear of being commercial - a fear that can create an introverted attitude: the desire to protect one’s artistic and personal integrity and not “become a sell out”.One explanation for this fear of being commercial, is that the artists “become their own trademark" and that their own person and personality often plays a large part in their creations. This often means taking failures and “no answers” on a personal level. Hence the artists feel that they have the need to protect themselves from “attacks” (for example from buyers who turn them down). 
This attitude can lead to thoughts and feelings such as “the customer does not know what I as an artist actually do and does not understand my work” and not wanting to" sell one’s soul" by adapting one’s products / works to the needs and desires of the market.The attitude that might be perceived as failure to adapt, therefore appears to be a way for the artist to protect their person and their integrity.The risk is therefore that the artists shut themselves out of the industry and the community that they after all are a part of. 
If an artist has this attitude with the implication that the outside world does not exist as a receiver - well, then it is not strange that she or he can not live on their talent.

 

How come it’s extremely difficult for artists to live on their talent?

A brilliant description of one the obstacles, made by Stefan Karlsson, Janne Lundqvist, Sara Lönnroth and Niklas Strandqvist. Taken from their report “Att leva på sin talang – kreatörers behov av entreprenörskap”

A common trait among artists is the notion that creative development is the only thing of importance - a mindset that means that the focus is on the creative idea, the drive and the feel. Artists with such mindset are often so focused on their work and its completion, that the importance of the outside world at least as a "consumer" completely disappears. In this situation there also exists a fear of being commercial - a fear that can create an introverted attitude: the desire to protect one’s artistic and personal integrity and not “become a sell out”.
One explanation for this fear of being commercial, is that the artists become their own trademark" and that their own person and personality often plays a large part in their creations. This often means taking failures and “no answers” on a personal level. Hence the artists feel that they have the need to protect themselves from attacks” (for example from buyers who turn them down).

This attitude can lead to thoughts and feelings such as “the customer does not know what I as an artist actually do and does not understand my workand not wanting to" sell one’s soul" by adapting one’s products / works to the needs and desires of the market.
The attitude that might be perceived as failure to adapt, therefore appears to be a way for the artist to protect their person and their integrity.
The risk is therefore that the artists shut themselves out of the industry and the community that they after all are a part of.

If an artist has this attitude with the implication that the outside world does not exist as a receiver - well, then it is not strange that she or he can not live on their talent.

 

If Heaven Exists, Active Child would be playing the Soundtrack for it.
That was my experience of the concert I say Saturday night at Debaser in Stockholm. This amazing band just knocked me off my feet and enchanted me with their heavenly music.
It was pure luck that I got to enjoy this concert, since it was my dear friend Talia who told me to start listening to their music and go to their concert in the very last minute. I took her advice and this resulted in me listening to their album “You Are All I See”, on repeat, over and over again the entire day before the concert and I haven’t stopped listening to it yet. I’m really happy I did! It’s almost a scary thought, to think about all those other amazing concerts that I might have missed just because of pure ignorance.

 

If Heaven Exists, Active Child would be playing the Soundtrack for it.

That was my experience of the concert I say Saturday night at Debaser in Stockholm. This amazing band just knocked me off my feet and enchanted me with their heavenly music.

It was pure luck that I got to enjoy this concert, since it was my dear friend Talia who told me to start listening to their music and go to their concert in the very last minute. I took her advice and this resulted in me listening to their album “You Are All I See”, on repeat, over and over again the entire day before the concert and I haven’t stopped listening to it yet. I’m really happy I did! It’s almost a scary thought, to think about all those other amazing concerts that I might have missed just because of pure ignorance.

 

Kurt Cobain about Love and not being able to buy Happiness 

I really was a lot more negative and angry and everything else a few years ago, but that had a lot to do with not having a mate, not having a steady girlfriend and stuff like that, so that was one of the main things that was bothering me, that I wouldn’t admit at the time.

Now that I found that, the world seems a lot better for some reason, it really does change your attitude about things, I mean 4 years ago I would had said the classic thing like how dare someone bring a child into this life its completely a terrible way to go and the world is going to explode any day or something like that, but once u fall in love it’s a different..

- Kurt Cobain

The Philosophy of Grunge
I consider myself being a big fan not only of the grunge music scene but also of the “grunge philosophy”, meaning the mindset of this alternative music scene. It’s a mindset that emphasizes the importance of humanity according to me. 
It goes against consumerist society and fights for our rights to be free from the ownership of corporations, media and society. Grunge is about remaining true to yourself and not pretending or feeling like you have to be someone else. It’s stepping away from self-absorption and starting to care about the people around you. It’s protesting against the fixation of beauty and perfection and letting us know that appearance doesn’t matter, the inside does. It’s realizing that happiness doesn’t come from fortune and fame, rather the opposite.
And since grunge is a mindset, the act of wearing a flannel shirt or listening to grunge music, doesn’t automatically make you grunge. 
This philosophy was something that could be read between the lines in the documentary “Kurt and Courtney”, which I saw yesterday at the Tempo Film Festival in Stockholm. A really good documentary by filmmakers Nick Broomfield and Joan Churchill, which investigates Kurt Cobain’s suicide and the conspiracies around it.

The Philosophy of Grunge

I consider myself being a big fan not only of the grunge music scene but also of the “grunge philosophy”, meaning the mindset of this alternative music scene. It’s a mindset that emphasizes the importance of humanity according to me.

It goes against consumerist society and fights for our rights to be free from the ownership of corporations, media and society. Grunge is about remaining true to yourself and not pretending or feeling like you have to be someone else. It’s stepping away from self-absorption and starting to care about the people around you. It’s protesting against the fixation of beauty and perfection and letting us know that appearance doesn’t matter, the inside does. It’s realizing that happiness doesn’t come from fortune and fame, rather the opposite.

And since grunge is a mindset, the act of wearing a flannel shirt or listening to grunge music, doesn’t automatically make you grunge.

This philosophy was something that could be read between the lines in the documentary “Kurt and Courtney”, which I saw yesterday at the Tempo Film Festival in Stockholm. A really good documentary by filmmakers Nick Broomfield and Joan Churchill, which investigates Kurt Cobain’s suicide and the conspiracies around it.

Hit so Hard

Really enjoyed “Hit so hard” at Tempo Dokumentärfestival, a movie about the drummer Patty Schemel from Hole with photage of Courtney Love, Kurt Cobain & many more. Interesting to hear from singer Phranc that the grunge-look came from “lesbian & queer fashion”.

Crowd funding with Jennifer Fox                                                          

My reincarnation is a documentary, which Jennifer Fox began to work with in 1989 and took her 22 years to finish. At the point where her film was completed, there was no money left to distribute it and the situation felt so hopeless that Jennifer was close to claim bankruptcy. Out of desperation Jennifer turned to crowd funding and managed to raise $150,000 in 90 days!

Today I had the privilege to listen to Jennifer’s seminar on crowd funding at the Tempo film festival in Stockholm. For those of you who missed it, here’s a short summary!

When introducing the subject fundraising, Jennifer begins to ask us about our perceptions of fundraising and the general opinion wasn’t very positive. Fundraising was looked upon as an embarrassing act, since you have to expose our problems to the general public. It’s a modern version of passing around the hat and it’s a dependency that can be very scary and also be a stopping point for your project. To fundraise, you have to sell your project and in order to sell your project you have to believe in it and once you’ve sold your project and received funds for it you might even feel restricted and tied up to your first idea since that is what the fundraisers expect as a result. Not many positive thoughts about the subject it seems.

In response Jennifer tries to cheer us up by telling us “Change is possible and necessary.” We have to embrace our discomfort and change our attitude because the means for funding and filmmaking are constantly changing. Artists actually have to work for a living and they’ve always been forced to survive through patronage. We have to look at the positive side of the subject. Fundraising helps to build an audience, because when you invest in something you naturally become involved and even more so through crowd funding. It gives you ownership, the feeling of making a difference and being connected to an artist and his or her project, the chance to communicate with the source of art, the possibility to participate or give your opinion and of course you always get a token for your support.

As a filmmaker you constantly have to work on fundraising. It doesn’t matter if you’re in pre-production, production, postproduction or distribution, you always need money. Of course this doesn’t make it easier for us since many times we have to sell our idea before we know what our idea is about. And to believe in something that doesn’t exist can be a challenge.

Before throwing ourselves and our film into crowd funding, we have to be aware of that not all films are crowd funding projects. Jennifer claims that your film should handle an issue that has a web-based community and targets a niche audience in order to be successful. And as with everything else, you have to be prepared. Do your research about what platform you should use, e.g. Kickstarter, Funded by me, indiegogo, etc. Think about how you want to pitch your idea, what you are going to show and write and how much you want to raise. Be convincing by showing good photage and a treatment. Constantly update your profile and make improvements. Give your crowd a reason to come back to your site and promote it to others!

Overcome your fear of fundraising and go for it!

And as Jennifer said “No is never no, it’s just not now”

 

 

Freshest ♡ Mahoyo from Freshest on Vimeo.

I Have Friends That Do Amazing Things

Check out Freshest ♡ Mahoyo and their version of Grillat & Grändys “Vafan Händz?!”